Find the Best Senior Care
& Free Resources in Your Local Area.

When Dad Keeps Asking About Your Mother Who Passed Years Ago, What Do You Tell Him?

Your mother passed away years ago. Your father was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and is having an extremely difficult time as of late. He keeps asking about her, wanting to see her, and wondering when she’ll be home. At first, the pain of having to relive those moments was hurtful but you told him the truth. It almost seemed cruel to keep doing this but wonder about the wisdom of telling him lies.

Alzheimer’s is a disease that affects the brain.

It can affect memory first. In fact, memory loss is one of the earliest signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. It usually affects a person’s ability to maintain their daily life and routine. They might use the wrong words at times, have trouble keeping track of conversations, miss appointments, and more.

As the disease progresses, it can cause an individual to forget where they are, what year it is, or major events that have already taken place. When your father asks about your mother you want to protect him as best you can.

It’s not the worst thing to tell a little lie.

When it comes to dementia, including Alzheimer’s, a lie can offer a sense of peace and comfort, even a distraction. Advocates promote telling the truth in all circumstances. Although great advice for most men and women it is important to know how Alzheimer’s affects the brain how people process information, and whether a little lie could be beneficial at providing comfort or a sense of peace. This is where things can become complicated.

Some advocates believe that redirection, little white lies, or half-truths can provide a sense of comfort for those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or other types of dementia. Each person should analyze and make this determination on their own. Is it wrong either way? No.

The important question is, what could provide comfort and improve quality of life for seniors diagnosed with Alzheimer’s who have questions, time dysplasia, or confusion.

If you or a loved one are considering hiring home care for veterans, please contact the friendly staff at Veterans Care Coordination™. Call today: 1-855-380-4400